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Center Street, Carr House, Charles, 49-51 Center Street, North Easton, MA, circa 1850, info, Easton Historical Society

Center Street, Carr House, Charles, 49-51 Center Street, North Easton, MA,  circa 1850, info, Easton Historical Society

More information on this image is available at the Easton Historical Society in North Easton, MA
www.flickr.com/photos/historicalimagesofeastonma/albums
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The development by Oliver Ames and Sons Corporation of the factory and village land use in a rather organic manner with a mix work-related classes created an integrated geographic network. The housing on perimeter edge with factories and business affairs in the center creating the village concept in North Easton. Other important concepts were the Furnace Village Cemetery, Furnace Village Grammar School and the Furnace Village Store, which explains Furnace Village and other sections of Easton.
source: Massachusetts Historical Commission
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History of Center Street below
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49-51 Center Street
In July of 1870, the house later known as the Charles Carr House was standing at 39, currently, 49-51 Center Street, also, known as Two Day Street when Charles Carr purchased the property from Daniel and Hannah Stearns Lille. The Lilles were residing at 44 Center Street when they sold the corner parcel and buildings to Charles and Harriet Ann Carr. About 1828, Charles Carr was born to Alpheus, a boot maker, and Eliza Carr, who were living in North Bridgewater, currently known as Brockton. On April 17, 1831, Sarah Frances Randall Dickerman was born to James and Sally Randall Dickerman. In 1850, Charles Carr was still living with his parents, Alpheus and Eliza Carr, who were living in North Bridgewater, currently known as Brockton. On March 2, 1851, Charles Carr, in his first marriage, married Sarah Frances Dickerman in North Bridgewater, currently, Brockton. On January 27, 1852, Sarah Frances Randall Dickerman passed away during childbirth in Brockton, with her burial in the Washington Street Cemetery. On December 24, 1853, for his second marriage, widowed Charles Carr married Harriet Ann Hartwell. By 1860, Charles and Harriet Ann Hartwell Carr had purchased a home near his parents’ home in North Bridgewater, currently known as Brockton.In 1860, residing in North Bridgewater, currently known as Brockton were Charles, a boot maker, and Harriet Ann Hartwell Carr, with their son, Charles Burleigh, and their two daughters, Emily P. and Harriet Eliza, and his daughter, Sarah Frances Carr. On October 27, 1860, Charles and Sarah Frances Randall Dickerman Carr’s daughter, Sarah Frances Carr passed away at the age of eight. In 1870, renting and residing at 39, currently, 49-51 Center Street, also, known as Two Day Street were Charles, a butcher, and his wife, Harriet Ann Hartwell Carr, with their three daughters, Emily Priscilla, Harriet Eliza, Ellen, and their two sons, George, and Charles Burleigh Carr. In July of 1870, Charles and Harriet Ann Carr paid Daniel and Hannah Stearns Lille three thousand, one hundred and thirty-two dollars for the five-eighth corner parcel and the house with other buildings. In 1871, the map of North Eaton Village noted the Carr’s name on the property. In 1880, residing at 39, currently, 49-51 Center Street, also, known as Two Day Street were Charles, who kept a meat market, and his wife, Harriet Ann Carr, who kept house, with their three daughters, Emily Priscilla, Harriet Eliza, dress maker, Ellen, dress maker, and their two sons, George, and Charles Burleigh Carr, who worke in the meat market. In 1889, the Easton Massachusetts City Directory listed Charles Carr working in provisions at the corner of Center and Day Streets and his son, Charles Burleigh Carr as a clerk for Charles Carr on Center Street. In 1900, residing at 39, currently, 49-51 Center Street, also, known as Two Day Street were Charles, and his wife, Harriet Ann Carr, and their daughter, Ellen Carr. On April 27, 1902, Charles Carr passed away, with his burial in the Village Cemetery. On November 1, 1907, Harriet Ann Hartwell Carr passed away, with her burial in the Village Cemetery. In 1908, Harriet Ann Hartwell Carr’s daughter, Harriet Eliza Carr Williams transferred her share of the property at 39, currently, 49-51 Center Street, also, known as Two Day Street to her sister, Ellen Carr. In 1900 and 1910, residing at 12 Day Street were Lorenzo, a postmaster, and his wife, Emily P. Carr Crockett, and their daughter, Sadie C. Crockett. On May 5, 1881, Emily P. Carr married Lorenzo B. Crockett in Easton. On November 28, 1916, Emily P. Carr Crockett passed away, with her burial in the Village Cemetery. In 1920, residing at 12 Day Street were widowed Lorenzo B. Crockett, his daughter, Sadie C. Crockett Cuzner, and her husband, Frank Cuzner, their daughter, Helen E. Cuzner, and their son, Frank C. Cuzner. and Lorenzo’s sister-in-law, Ellen Carr. In 1923, Ellen Carr sold the property at 39, currently, 49-51 Center Street, also, known as Two Day Street to Dennis and Catherine Harlow. In 1917, the Easton Massachusetts City Directory listed Dennis Harlow residing on Day Street with his wife, Catherine, and working as a shoemaker. In 1920, renting across the street in the Robert B. Porter House at Three Day Street were Dennis F., a shoe factory welter, and his wife, Catherine M. Harlow, a shoe factory stitcher, with their two sons, Louis F. and John W Harlow, and their two daughters, Louise Harlow, and C. Beatrice Harlow. In 1923, Ellen Carr sold the property at 39, currently, 49-51 Center Street, also, known as Two Day Street to Dennis and Catherine Harlow. By 1930, Dennis and Catherine M. Harlow with their family owned and were living in a house on Rawlins Avenue in the Bronx in fresh York City. While living in fresh York City, Dennis and Catherine M. Harlow retained ownership of 39, currently, 49-51 Center Street, also, known as Two Day Street. In 1930, renting at 49 Center Street, also, known as Two Day Street were Harry B., foundry moulder, and his wife, Mabel J. Patterson, and their son, Ralph E. Patterson. In 1930, renting at 49-51 Center Street, also, known as Two Day Street were Arthur A., a shoe shop edge trimmer, and his wife, Lucy Jackman, a market bookkeeper, with their three sons, Arthur, Royle, a market salesman, and Chester Jackman, and their two daughters, Leola, and Lucile Jackman, and Arthur A. Jackman’s father, William A. Jackman. In 1930, renting at 51 Center Street, also, known as Two Day Street were widow Lucy Jackman, a private home housekeeper, and her son, Chester, a mill truck man, and her daughter, Lucile Jackman, who worked as a state hospital nurse. In 1945, Catherine Harlow sold 49-51 Center Street.
source; Massachusetts Historical Commission
source: History of Easton, William L. Chaffin, 1886
source: Easton’s Neighborhoods, Edmund C. Hands, 1995
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8 Day Street
Between 1890 and 1895, the Charles Burleigh Carr House at Eight Day Street was built for Charles Burleigh, and his wife, Georgia Kimball Carr. About 1828, his father, Charles Carr was born to Alpheus, a boot maker, and Eliza Carr, who were living in North Bridgewater, currently known as Brockton. On March 2, 1851, Charles Burleigh Carr’s father, Charles Carr, his first marriage, married Sarah Frances Dickerman in North Bridgewater, currently, Brockton. On January 27, 1852, Sarah Frances Randall Dickerman passed away during childbirth in Brockton, with her burial in the Washington Street Cemetery. On December 24, 1853, for his second marriage, widowed Charles Carr married Harriet Ann Hartwell. By 1860, Charles and Harriet Ann Hartwell Carr had purchased a home near his parents’ home in North Bridgewater, currently known as Brockton. In 1860, residing in North Bridgewater, currently known as Brockton were Charles, a boot maker, and Harriet Ann Hartwell Carr, with their son, Charles Burleigh, and their two daughters, Emily P. and Harriet Eliza, and his daughter, Sarah Frances Carr. On October 27, 1860, Charles and Sarah Frances Randall Dickerman Carr’s daughter, Sarah Frances Carr passed away at the age of eight. In 1870, renting and residing at 49-51 Center Street, also, known as Two Day Street were Charles, a butcher, and his wife, Harriet Ann Hartwell Carr, with their three daughters, Emily Priscilla, Harriet Eliza, Ellen, and their two sons, George, and Charles Burleigh Carr. In 1889, the Easton Massachusetts City Directory listed Charles Carr as working in provisions at the corner of Center and Day Streets and his son, Charles Burleigh Carr as a clerk for Charles Carr on Center Street. In June of 1890, Charles and Harriet Ann Hartwell Carr transferred ownership of a parcel of land at Eight Day Street to their son. Charles Burleigh Carr before his marriage. On November 12, 1890, Charles Burleigh Carr married Georgia Kimball, from Littleton, in Easton. Between their marriage in 1890 and 1895, Charles Burleigh and Georgia Kimball Carr built a house on the south side of Day Street as noted on a 1895 map of North Easton. Charles Burleigh Carr started out in the grocery and meat business by working in his father’s meat market and was his own provisions dealer by the time of his marriage in 1890. In 1900, residing at Eight Day Street were Charles Burleigh, a provision dealer, and his wife, Georgia Kimball Carr. In 1907, Charles Burleigh and Georgia Kimball Carr moved to Maine where their only child, Richard B. Carr, was born. In 1910, renting and residing on Spruce Street in Portland, Maine were Charles Burleigh, a provision dealer, and his wife, Georgia Kimball Carr, and their two-year old son. Richard B. Carr. In 1911, Charles Burleigh, and his wife, Georgia Kimball Carr, while living in Maine, sold Eight Day Street to George C. Barrows, who was residing in his parents’ home at 11 Lincoln Street. By 1917, Charles Burleigh, and his wife, Georgia Kimball Carr, with their son, Richard B. Carr, moved back to Easton to live with Charles’s sister, Ellen Carr, at 39, currently, 49-51 Center Street. In 1917, the Easton Massachusetts City Directory listed Charles Burleigh Carr living on Center Street with his wife, Georgia, working as a clerk. In 1920, residing in Charles’ childhood home with his sister, Ellen Carr located at 39, currently, 49-51 Center Street, were Charles Burleigh and his wife, Georgia Kimball Carr, and their twelve-year old son. Richard B. Carr. On January 12, 1921, Charles Burleigh Carr passed away, with his burial in the Village Cemetery. Between her husband’s passing and 1930, widow Georgia Kimball Carr purchased a house on Pond Street residing there and working in a hospital by 1930. On November 26, 1956, Georgia Kimball Carr passed away, with her burial in the Village Cemetery. In 1919, George C. Barrows sold the property at Eight Day Street to Attorney David John, and his wife, Edith G. O’Connell. In 1900, David John O’Connell was residing on Sheridan Street with his parents, Charles and Mary O’Connell. On June 4, 1904, David John O’Connell married Edith Gertrude McCaffrey in Somerville. In 1917, the Easton Massachusetts City Directory listed David John O’Connell residing with wife, Edith Gertrude McCaffrey O’Connell, and as a lawyer at home and in the Tremont Building B in Boston. In 1910, renting on Center Street were David John, with a law practice, and his wife, Edith Gertrude McCaffrey O’Connell, with four-year-old daughter, Edith M., and their one-year-old son, David C. O’Connell. In 1920, owning and residing at Eight Day Street were David John, a general practice lawyer, and his wife, Edith Gertrude McCaffrey O’Connell, with a fourteen-year-old daughter, Edith M., and their eleven-year-old son, David C., and their two-year-old son, Phillip O’Connell. In 1930, owning and residing at Eight Day Street were David John, a general practice lawyer, and his wife, Edith Gertrude McCaffrey O’Connell, with their three sons, David C., Phillip, and Charles O’Connell. In 1940, owning and residing at Eight Day Street were David John, a general practice lawyer, and his wife, Edith Gertrude McCaffrey O’Connell, with their three sons, David C., Phillip, and Charles O’Connell. Living with the family was David John O’Connell’s sister, Mary A. O’Connell, who was a public-school teacher. By 1949, David John O’Connell passed away, and his widow Edith Gertrude McCaffrey O’Connell sold the property.
source: History of Easton, William L. Chaffin, 1886
source: Easton’s Neighborhoods, Edmund C. Hands, 1995
source; Massachusetts Historical Commission
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12 Day Street
About A1890, the Lorenzo B. Crockett House at Six, currently 12 Day Street was built for Lorenzo Brackett and Emily Priscilla Carr Crockett. In 1868, Jason Guild, and Martha B. Howard’s daughter, Emogene Howard married George Francis Faxon Wilde. In 1870, moving back to Easton and residing in their newly built house at 37 Center Street were Jason Guild and his wife, Martha B. Howard, with their daughter, Emogene Howard Wilde, and her husband, George Francis Faxon Wilde, and their son, George H. Wilde, and Martha’s sister, Joan Bartlett. Census records do not list Lorenzo Brackett Crockett residing at 37 Center Street. Historical records and directories listed Lorenzo Brackett Crockett as living with George Francis Faxon Wilde at 37 Center Street, with G. F. Wilde his employer by 1880. In 1860, residing in North Bridgewater, currently known as Brockton were Charles, a boot maker, and Harriet Ann Hartwell Carr, with their son, Charles Burleigh, and their two daughters, Emily Priscilla and Harriet Eliza, and his daughter, Sarah Frances Carr. On October 27, 1860, Charles and Sarah Frances Randall Dickerman Carr’s daughter, Sarah Frances Carr passed away at the age of eight. In 1870, renting and residing at 39, currently, 49-51 Center Street, also, known as Two Day Street were Charles, a butcher, and his wife, Harriet Ann Hartwell Carr, with their three daughters, Emily Priscilla, Harriet Eliza, Ellen, and their two sons, George, and Charles Burleigh Carr. In July of 1870, Charles and Harriet Ann Carr paid Daniel and Hannah Stearns Lille three thousand, one hundred and thirty-two dollars for the five-eighth corner parcel and the house with other buildings. In 1871, the map of North Eaton Village noted the Carr’s name on the property. In 1880, residing at 39, currently, 49-51 Center Street, also, known as Two Day Street were Charles, who kept a meat market, and his wife, Harriet Ann Carr, who kept house, with their three daughters, Emily Priscilla, Harriet Eliza, dress maker, Ellen, dress maker, and their two sons, George, and Charles Burleigh Carr, who worked in the meat market. On May 5, 1881, Lorenzo Brackett Crockett married Emily Priscilla Carr in Easton. In 1871 and 1886, the maps of North Eason Village noted the name of Charles Carr, on a long parcel, from 39, currently, 49-51 Center Street, at the corner westward on the south side of Day Street. In June of 1890, Emily Priscilla Carr Crockett’s parents, Charles and Harriet Ann Hartwell Carr transferred ownership of a parcel of land at Eight Day Street to Emily’s brother, Charles Burleigh Carr before his marriage to Georgia Kimball Carr. At the same time, Emily’s parents transferred ownership of this property at Six, currently 12 Day Street next to her brother`s property on the west. During the same time, Emily and her brother, Charles Burleigh Carr’s aunt, Zilphia Jane Carr Lyon and husband, Charles R. Lyon, resided across the street in the Robert B. Porter House at Three Day Street until 1899. In 1889, In 1889, the Easton, Massachusetts Directory listed George F. Wilde as residing on Center Street and as a Lieutenant in the U.S. Navy. In 1889, the Easton, Massachusetts Directory listed Lorenzo Brackett Crockett employed by G. F. Wilde in Easton. In 1900, residing at Six, currently 12 Day Street were Lorenzo Brackett, the Town Postmaster, and his wife, Emily Priscilla Carr Crockett, and their daughter, Sarah C. Crockett. who was at school. In 1910, residing at Six, currently, 12 Day Street were Lorenzo Brackett, the Town Postmaster, and his wife, Emily Priscilla Carr Crockett, and their daughter, Sarah C. Crockett was the Assistant Town Postmaster. On August 17, 1910, Sarah Carr Crockett married Frank Hedley Cuzner in Easton. On November 28,1916, Emily Priscilla Carr passed away, with her burial in the Village Cemetery. In 1917, the Easton, Massachusetts Directory listed Lorenzo B. Crockett as an engineer living at Six, currently, 12 Day Street with his wife, Emily P. Crockett. In 1917, the Easton, Massachusetts Directory listed Frank H. Cuzner as owner of a fish market on Main Street, living with his wife, Sarah C. Cuzner at Six, currently, 12 Day Street. In 1920, residing at Six, currently, 12 Day Street was widowed Lorenzo Brackett Crockett, a retired postmaster, with his daughter, Sarah Carr Crockett Cuzner, and her husband, Frank Hedley Cuzner, a fish marker owner, and with their daughter, Helen E., and their son, Frank C. Cuzner, and Lorenzo’s sister-in-law, Ellen Carr. On November 21, 1921, Frank Hedley Cuzner passed away, with his burial in the Village Cemetery. On August 15, 1929, Lorenzo Brackett Crockett passed away, with his burial in the Village Cemetery. In 1930, residing at Six, currently, 12 Day Street was widow Sarah Carr Crockett Cuzner, a post office clerk, with her daughter, Helen E., and her son, Frank C. Cuzner, and Sarah’s sister, Ellen Carr. In 1930, widow Sarah Carr Crockett Cuzner owned the house at Six, currently 12 Day Street valued at two thousand dollars, a barn at two hundred dollars, a garage at one-hundred and fifty dollars, and just over one-half-acre lot worth six hundred and fifty dollars. In 1940, residing at 12 Day Street was widow Sarah Carr Crockett Cuzner, a post office clerk, with her son, Frank C. Cuzner, a wholesale radio supply company office clerk, and Sarah’s sister, Ellen Carr. In 1951, Sarah Carr Crockett Cuzner passed the property to her son, Frank C. Cuzner. On February 20, 1959, Sarah Carr Crockett Cuzner passed away, with her burial in the Village Cemetery. In 1968, Frank C. Cuzner deeded the property to himself, and his wife, Genevieve Cuzner.
source: History of Easton, William L. Chaffin, 1886
source: Easton’s Neighborhoods, Edmund C. Hands, 1995
source; Massachusetts Historical Commission
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Center Street
Centre Street connects North Easton village with Easton Centre. A very little section of this street, that from Daniel Clark’s to Short Street, was laid out in 1738, and was, as before stated, the connecting link between what are currently Summer and Short streets. But just after the building of the fresh meeting- house at the Centre in 1752, it was extended both south from Short Street and north to Samuel Phillips, Jr.’s, west of the DeWitt farm. This was a part of what was known as the old Meetinghouse road. The north part of this old road was laid out in 1764. It began south of the cart bridge near John Randall’s (that is, near the Ames store), went up the hill, then westerly a short distance on Lincoln Street, and then south to join that part of the road laid out in 1752. There were then living along the line of this proposed road Mrs. Whitman, widow of John Whitman, whose house was on Lincoln Street, and also about a quarter of a mile south, Nahum Niles. Some distance below him lived Benjamin Phillips, and still farther south Samuel Phillips, Jr., where the fresh road formed a connection with the old. This road may still be traversed from end to end. The writer drove through it with a horse and buggy in the summer of 1886. It was discontinued in 1828, though a little money has been expended on it just above Daniel Clark’s, where Patrick Menton currently lives. This discontinuance was in consequence of the laying out of the fresh road, currently Centre Street, in 1828. There was considerable disagreement about this laying out, but it was finally accomplished. There have been some changes in the grading, etc., but the road remains substantially the same as when laid out.
source: History of Easton, William L. Chaffin, 1886

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